Yearly Calendar 2018

2018(April, 2018 – March, 2019)

Talks & Tours in the Museum Collection Gallery
Schedule may be changed without notice.

Special Exhibition Gallery

The 150th Anniversary of his Birth: Yokoyama Taikan

 

April 13 – May 27, 2018
*Closed on: Mondays (except April 30)

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Catalog

Yokoyama Taikan (1868-1958) is a top artist of modern Japanese painting, known for having painted over 1,500 pictures of Mount Fuji and Metempsychosis, a more than forty-meter long sumi  ink scroll. This is a major retrospective commemorating the 150th anniversary of his birth.

“A painting has to be painted persistently with your heart.” “A painting reflects the painter himself.” Such remarks may give the impression of a very serious-minded person, but Taikan also had a highly adventurous spirit and a playful mind. In his paintings, he exerted his ingenuity to surprise people and made unremitting efforts to pioneer pictorial representation.

So as to bring such an image of this artist to light, while paying due attention to Taikan’s young days, presented in this exhibition is a choice selection of approximately ninety works. Not only are there must-see materpieces by Taikan but also newly discovered works, through which you will be able to uncover the charms of Taikan anew.

 

 

Gordon Matta-Clark: Mutation in Space

June 19 – September 17, 2018
*Closed on: Mondays (except July 16 and September 17); and July 17

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Catalog

This is the first full-scale retrospective of American artist Gordon Matta-Clark (1943–1978) in Asia. Though having studied architecture at university, Matta-Clark changed his field of action to art, and was active in the 1970s mainly in New York. In spite of his short career until his death from disease at the age of thirty-five, Matta-Clark has continued to influence many artists to this day.

Matta-Clark made a great impact on the art world at that time with his “building cuts” projects in which he removed parts of floors and walls from buildings to be demolished, transforming the mundane to totally new space and time. In addition, he joined on with 112, a space for art, music and dance, and with FOOD, an artist-run restaurant. He was also one of the first artists who paid attention to street culture such as graffiti. Thus Matta-Clark presented a new image of artists, sensitively reading the atmosphere of the era.

Presenting his sculptures, photographs, videos and drawings, this exhibition aims to provide a full view of one of the most important artists in the 1970s.

 

 

Awakenings: Art in Society in Asia 1960s-1990s

Pablo Baens Santos, Manifesto, 1985-1987,
Collection of National Gallery Singapore

October 10 – December 24, 2018
*Closed on: Mondays (except December 24)

Catalog

A joint project by national art museums in Japan, Korea and Singapore, this is the first attempt at cross-border, comparative examination of the experimental trends in Asian art that appeared from the 1960s to the 1990s, a turbulent age for the region.

The years saw drastic changes in Asian societies because of the ideological confrontation during the Cold War, the Vietnam War, rising nationalism, rapid modernization and the surge of the pro-democracy movements. Against the backdrop of the turbulent period, young artists in Asia turned to the respective local issues and developed radical activities aimed at changing realities by restoring the critical function of art. They produced various outcomes deeply connected to society, including realism that critically reviewed everyday life in cities, conceptual art that questioned the Western system of “fine arts,” and works that cleverly utilized “traditional culture” in an attempt to form an alliance with the populace.

This exhibition extracts such activities by radical artists from the 1960s to the 1990s in the northeast, southeast and south Asia to consider their common features and differences in a transnational framework.

 

 

Laugh at This Hopeless World: Fukuzawa Ichiro

March 12-May 26, 2019
*Closed on: Mondays (except March 25, April 1, 29 and May 6); and May 7

Fukuzawa Ichiro (1898-1992) was a painter who played a central role in the avant-garde art movement before and after World War II. In the 1930s he introduced French surrealism to Japan, and produced a series of paintings with symbolic messages of social criticism. Although oppressed during war, the artist worked on large paintings of crowds of people from a social-critical perspective after the war, earning a Cultural Medal late in his life.

While maintaining a social perspective, Fukuzawa generalized issues by occasionally quoting classical paintings and treating social problems freely with intellectual humor, instead of advocating a rigid ideology. Presenting ninety paintings including Oxen (1936), one of his representative works, this exhibition reviews his work from today’s perspective, and consider the relationship between art and society.

 

 

Gallery 4

Takiguchi Shuzo and the Artists Who Captivated Him

TAKIGUCHI Shuzo, Decalcomania,
date unknown

June 19–September 24, 2018
*Closed on: Mondays (except July 16, September 17 and 24); July 17 and September 18

Catalog

Takiguchi Shuzo (1903–1979) was an art critic and poet who introduced surrealism to Japan, and kept on providing young artists with philosophical support.

In addition to thirteen works by Takiguchi, this exhibition presents works by surrealist painters such as Max Ernst and Joan Miró who attracted the critic; prewar avant-garde painters including Kitawaki Noboru; artists who joined the avant-garde artists’ group “Jikken Kobo” (lit. Experimental Workshop) including Yamaguchi Katsuhiro, Fukushima Hideko and Otsuji Kiyoji; and postwar avant-garde artists such as Akasegawa Gempei and Arakawa Shusaku. All the exhibits are from our collection.

 

 

I Want To Go Somewhere Far Away

KITAWAKI Noboru, Quo Vadis , 1949,
The National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo

October 6, 2018–January 20, 2019
*Closed on: Mondays (except October 8, December 24, 2018 and January 14, 2019); October 9 and December 25, 2018; December 28, 2018-January 1, 2019; and January 15, 2019

When do we think of a place different from where we are now? It may be when we think of familiar places and people there, when we yearn for strange lands remote from daily life, or when we wish to escape from the reality in front of us.

Taking a hint from the song Tohku E Ikitai (I want to go somewhere far away) that has been sung for more than fifty years, written by Ei Rokusuke, this exhibition presents about twenty-five works from our collection.

 

 

Sugiura Hisui: Image Collector

hisui

SUGIURA, Hisui, Mitsukoshi (department store): Ginza Branch Open on April 10, 1930,
The National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo

The First Period: February 9 – April 7, 2019
The Second Period: April 10 – May 26, 2019

*Some works will be replaced during the exhibition period.

*Closed on: Mondays (except February 11, March 25, April 1, 29 and May 6, 2019); February 12,  April 9 and May 7, 2019

 Zuan artist Sugiura Hisui (1876-1965) took an important role in the earliest days of Japanese graphic design. He actively promoted Zuan in his publications co-authored with Watanabe Soshu (1890-1986)—“Zuan no Bigaku (Aesthetics of Zuan)” and “Jitsuyo Zuan Shiryo Taisei (Compilation of practical Zuan materials)” and was engaged in Zuan education as the first president of Tama Imperial Art School (now Tama Art University) founded in 1935.
 In addition to Suigiura’s representative works such as posters for Mitsukoshi department store and various cover designs for books and magazines, the exhibition will showcase materials previously owned by Sugiura including French illustrated newspaper “L’Illustration”, American graph magazine “LIFE”, and his scrapbooks for the first time so as to reveal another dimension of Sugiura’s creative practice as an image collector.

 

 

Images collected by Sugiura Hisui, date unknown,
The National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo

Scrapbooks by Sugiura Hisui, date unknown,
The National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo

Collection Gallery

MOMAT Collection

One of the largest collection exhibitions in Japan, MOMAT Collection  presents 200 works selected in each exhibition period from our collection of more than 13,000 items including Japanese- and Western-style paintings, prints, sculptures, photographs and videos.

As the only exhibition in Japan giving you an insight into Japanese art in and after the twentieth century at a single stroke, it offers diverse ways of appreciating art by changing exhibits after every exhibition period, and by giving small thematic exhibitions.

To provide a comfortable experience in broad galleries, we offer spacious places for relaxation including A Room With a View  overlooking the Imperial Palace and areas near Tokyo Station, as well as various chairs.

 

November 14, 2017 – May 27, 2018
*Closed on: Mondays (except February 12, March 26, April 2 and 30, 2018); and February 13, 2018

 

■June 5 – September 24, 2018
*Closed on: Mondays (except July 16, September 17, 24); July 17 and September 18

 

■October 6, 2018 – January 20, 2019
*Closed on: Mondays (except October 8, December 24, 2018 and January 14, 2019); October 9 and December 25, 2018; December 28, 2018 – January 1, 15, 2019

 

■January 29 – May 26, 2019
*Closed on: Mondays (except February 11, March 25, April 1, 29 and May 6); February 12 and May 7, 2019

 

 

*Museum closed between the shows for preparation.

 

 

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December 15, 2018 (Sat)

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