Past Events

  • March 23 - April 11, 2021

Spring Festival

in The National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo

 

The museum is conveniently located for those visiting the Imperial Palace, and a must-see place particularly in spring when cherry blossoms are in full bloom. You can view Japanese paintings acclaimed as masterpieces along with cherry blossoms, thereby enjoying Japan’s graceful spring.

Exhibitions

MOMAT Collection Date: March 23 - May 16

Near the MOMAT are the Imperial Palace, Chidorigafuchi and Kitanomaru Park, ones of Japan’s most renowned places for cherry blossoms. In the once-a-year cherry blossom season, we feature Kawai Gyokudo’s Parting Spring, a masterpiece depicting cherry blossoms (Important Cultural Property), Atomi Gyokushi’s Scroll of Cherry Blossoms showing more than forty species of cherry such as weeping cherry; prints by Kawase Hasui and others; and Kamaga Toshiko’s kimono, Field in Spring. Do not miss the chance of appreciating masterpieces that decorate the season.

The museum’s collection gallery displays 200 works from its collection of more than 13,000 works–mainly masterpieces of modern Japanese art. You can learn of the 20th-century history of Japanese art from works on display with English explanations.

 

 

Kawai Gyokudo, Parting Spring, 1916, Important Cultural Property

Funada Gyokuju, Flowers (Image of Evening), 1938


Ayashii : Decadent and Grotesque Images of Beauty in Modern Japanese Art Date: March 23–May 16, 2021

Kainosho Tadaoto, Yokogushi (A Comb in the Side Hair), c. 1916, The National Museum of Modern Art, Kyoto



Japan in the Meiji period (1868–1912) received Western knowledge and technology in every field. Inspired by the Western counterpart, Japanese art also adapted itself to the new era.
Many works produced under the circumstances contain expressions other than “simple beauty,” such as decadence, sensuousness, grotesqueness, and eroticism. Stirring controversy in the art world, this tendency reached the populace through art and illustrations for literature as the reflections of people’s desire and anxiety in a turbulent age. illustrations for literature
This exhibition illustrates the trend with paintings, prints, and illustrations from magazines and books produced in the period from the mid-19th century until around 1930.

 

Find out more

 

Hallucinating Lenses
Primarily from the Museum Collection
Date: March 23–May 16, 2021

Cameras are thought to be devices that objectively reflect the world. When connected with photographers’ imagination, however, cameras—the mechanical eye different from the human eye—sometimes open the door to hallucination.
Centering on Kawada Kikuji’s The Last Cosmology and Fukase Masahisa’s Ravens, this show explores another aspect of photography. You are invited to view this exhibition along with Ayashii : Decadent and Grotesque Images of Beauty in Modern Japanese Art being presented simultaneously.

 

 

 

 

Enjoy the Height of Spring!

 

The museum will prepare a Japanese-style rest area in the front courtyard during Spring Festival.

In order to prevent the spread of infection with the COVID-19, schedules and events are subject to change due to circumstances.

Location:
Art Museum
Date:
March 23– April 11, 2021
Time:
10:00 AM-5:00 PM
(Opens until 8:00 PM on Fridays and Saturdays)
*Admission until thirty minutes before closing
*Ayashii : Decadent and Grotesque Images of Beauty in Modern Japanese Art open at 9:30 AM
Closed:
Mondays (except March 29)

Art Museum

Address
3-1 Kitanomaru-koen, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8322

ACCESS

OPEN today

April 18, 2021 (Sun)

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